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FRIDAY FACE
  • Friday Face [Late 16c-1910s] - A Miserable or dour face. Thus, to be “Friday-faced” means to be miserable or gloomy.(note: this is attributed to the traditional abstinence on Fridays from either all food or meat)

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

100 Words (and phrases) to say instead of SWAG - Watsky

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Grin at the daisy roots
  • Grin at the daisy roots [late 19c] - to be dead (the view from the coffin underground)

source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print.

graveyard
  • Graveyard [19c - 1930s] - the mouth (from the resemblance of teeth to tombstones)

source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print.

Cement City
  • Cement City [1970s] - Cemetery

source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print.

Tree suit
  • Tree Suit [1940s-70s] - a coffin (US Black)

source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print.

Bone Juggler
  • Bone Juggler [1970s-80s] - a doctor (UK Black Use)

source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print.

Give someone the brown-trouser treatment
  • Give someone the brown-trouser treatment [1980s] - to terrify (to cause the act of soiling their trousers)

source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print.

graymite
  • graymite [late 19c] - a vegetarian (abbreviation of Graham-ite, from Sylvester graham, and advocate of vegetarianism)

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print.

Pull a Kite
  • Pull a Kite [late 19c] - to make a face, to grimace (from kite-nipped  - to suffer from stomach cramps)

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print.

Broadway hello

Broadway hello [1930s] - a friendly greeting that proceeds a homicidal attack (Underground use)

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print.

How are you blowing?
  • How are you blowing? [1900-1920s] - general term for informal greeting (chiefly Irish)

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print.

embalming fluid
  • embalming fluid [1920s] - coffee (tramp use)

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print.