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Brown Creatures
  • Brown Creatures [mid 19c-1920s] - Bronchitis (from a mispronunciation of the word)

source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

Beggar’s velvet
  • Beggar’s velvet [mid 19c] - Particles of lint and dirt that gather under the sofa

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

"Catch the owl"
  • "Catch the owl" [late 18c-early 19c] - a trick played on an innocent country person, who is lured into the barn under the pretext of “catching an owl”; when he enters, a bucket of water is poured on his head.

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

Brown hat
  • Brown Hat [19c] - a cat (rhyming slang)

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

All dolled up like a barber’s cat
  • All dolled up like a barber’s cat  [mid-late 19c] - dressed up at the height of fashion; fashionable

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

More information:

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-bar4.htm

Brother of the string
  • Brother of the string [late 17c-19c] - a musician

source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

MOP!
  • MOP! [1940s+] - a word used the indicate a sudden occurrence.

Example: I was walking the dog, then MOP! I’m involved in a police shootout.

(from jazz use - “mop” is the last beat at the end of a jazz number with a cadence of triplets)

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

Ricky-Tick
  • Ricky-Tick [1930s] - (jazz use) 1. Old fashioned, predictable, monotonous 2. Cheap, shabby

 

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

Lickdish
  • Lickdish (also lick-platter) [mid 16c-19c] - a general term of abuse, esp. of gluttony

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

Line of the old Author
  • Line of the Old Author [late 17c-early 19c] - a drink, esp. of brandy

also:

  • Leaf of the old author
  • Drop of the old author

source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

Dress Suit burglar
  • Dress Suit Burglar [1910s] - a lobbyist

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

Brother of the Quill
  • Brother of the Quill [late 17c-19c] - a writer; an author

Also:

  • Knight of the Quill
  • Gentleman of the Quill

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

Face Like Yesterday
  • Face Like Yesterday [1900-1910s] - phrase describing a miserable looking face

source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

Blanket
  • Blanket [mid 19c] - currency note/money (because it gives comfort)

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print

FRIDAY FACE
  • Friday Face [Late 16c-1910s] - A Miserable or dour face. Thus, to be “Friday-faced” means to be miserable or gloomy.(note: this is attributed to the traditional abstinence on Fridays from either all food or meat)

Source:

Green, Jonathon. Casell’s Dictionary of Slang - 2nd Edition. Weidenfeld & Nicholson. 2005. Print